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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Dr. Hurd' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Dr. Hurd'

(common manzanita)

This selection of the common manzanita features large, rounded leaves of a distinctive pale green coloration. Becomes a large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 15 ft. tall with a beautiful mahogany-red trunk and a broad, round form.  Showy large clusters of white urn-shaped flowers in January, followed by burnished red berries. Prefers full sun, decent drainage and no irrigation once established. 
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Garrison Canyon' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Garrison Canyon'

(common manzanita)

This large, tree-like selection comes from Garrison Canyon on Pepperwood Preserve above Mark West Springs. Big, round, pewter-green leaves adorn branches covered in smooth mahogany bark. Especially large clusters of soft-pink flowers emerge in late winter and are followed in summer by “little apple” fruits. In time, this selection may reach up to 15 ft. tall and wide. Provide full sun. Very drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Hood Mountain' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Hood Mountain'

(common manzanita)

A Nevin Smith introduction from Hood Mountain in Sonoma County, California.  A possible natural hybrid with A. canescens, this sturdy upright manzanita offers grayish-green leaves on sculpted dark purplish-grey branches, growing 8-10 ft. tall and wide at maturity. White, urn-shaped flowers in late winter/early spring are a favorite of hummingbirds and bees. The large upright manzanitas make stunning specimens and, where space allows, excellent hedge or screen plants. Plant in full sun where it will thrive with no summer irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Laguna White' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Laguna White'

(common manzanita)

Discovered along Guerneville Road near the Laguna de Santa Rosa, this remarkable manzanita boasts dense clusters of clear white flowers in winter with semi-glossy apple green leaves and burgundy colored bark. Plant in full sun where it will reach a height of about 8 ft. tall by 6 ft. wide or more over time. More garden tolerant than many manzanitas, this selection will accept occasional watering after establishment. Though drought tolerant, 'Laguna White' may benefit from deep monthly waterings in the summer, especially in hot interior sites. An excellent early source of nectar for hummingbirds and native bees.

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Lake Sonoma Pink'

(common manzanita)

We discovered this stunning manzanita above Lake Sonoma, which stood out with large, rounded clusters of the pinkest flowers we’ve ever seen on this species. The big, rounded leaves are an appealing grey-green, a pleasing compliment to the colorful blossoms. The smooth, burgundy branches reach up to about 15 ft tall and nearly as wide if left unpruned. Hummingbirds and bumblebees enjoy the late winter flowers, while birds eat the ”little apples” which ripen in the summer. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide little to no irrigation once established. Needs decent drainage. Great as a loose hedge or featured as specimen.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Mary's Blush' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Mary's Blush'

(common manzanita)

Selected along Guerneville Rd. in Sonoma County. It has the form and size of the common manzanita, 8 feet or more, with the disease resistance of the Vine Hill manzanita hybrids. Around a foot of growth a year is reasonable to expect initially. It has a beautiful deep mahogany trunk & is heavy flowering with clusters of pink flowers followed by beautiful red berries. Give it sun, good drainage and summer drought, but it's more tolerant than most of less than ideal conditions. The manzanita berries can attract mockingbirds, robins, and Cedar Waxwings. If unpruned it can provide cover for quail and wren-tits and its flowers provide nectar for native bees & hummingbirds.

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Molino Corner'

(common manzanita)

The clear white flowers and attractive, wavy, deep-green leaves make this wild selection from the Sebastopol area a real charmer. Burgundy bark clothes the sinuous trunks on this upright manzanita which reaches 8 ft or more tall and potentially as wide, if left unpruned. The urn-shaped flowers appear in late winter in good-sized clusters, followed by reddish fruits in the summer. This selection is part of a group manzanitas from west Sonoma Co. which naturally share genes with the vine hill manzanita, making them more garden tolerant than most inland forms. Plant in full sun to light shade. Water occasional or let go dry in the summer once established. A great winter food source for hummingbirds and bumblebees.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Monica' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Monica'

(common manzanita)

Found originally along Guerneville Rd. in Sonoma County. It has the form and size of the large common manzanita, 10 ft or more with time, and the disease resistance of the Vine Hill manzanita. Features a beautiful dark mahogany trunk and clusters of shell pink flowers set against dark, glossy leaves. More upright in form than most other tall manzanitas. Give it sun to light shade and summer drought, but it's more tolerant than most of some summer water.Provides food and cover for birds and its flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds and bumble bees.

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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Saint Helena'

(common manzanita)

A vigorous selection of the common manzanita selected by Nevin Smith from the slopes of Mount St. Helena in Napa County. A beautiful, upright, evergreen shrub with gorgeous, sinewy branches of smooth, red-brown bark and clean, green pointed leaves. Fast growing for a manzanita, this robust and disease resistant selection grows 10 -12 tall and wide with a broad, rounded shape. Pure white, urn-shaped blossoms in late winter and early spring are an important early nectar source for bumblebees and hummingbirds. The bronze, little, apple-like fruits are relished by wildlife. Plant in full sun with good drainage, where it will be drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Sebastopol White'  common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Sebastopol White'

(common manzanita)

This upright manzanita displays dense growth of soft green, pointed leaves with clusters of white flowers in winter on a burnished mahogany trunk. Reaches a height of 8 ft or more and a width of at least 6 ft. Discovered along Guerneville Rd. in western Sonoma County. Very drought tolerant once established but will tolerate moderate irrigation when young. A disease resistant selection. Heavy soils are not a problem as long as water does not pool at the crown in winter. Enjoys full sun but will tolerate light shade.
Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Warm Springs' common manzanita
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Arctostaphylos manzanita 'Warm Springs'

(common manzanita)

From the steep slopes above Lake Sonoma, growing among gray pines, madrones and buckeyes, comes this standout manzanita. We noticed the particularly gray foliage amongst its more green leaved brethren. Has proven to be a vigorous grower, developing gorgeous, smooth, red-purple bark. The winter blooming, urn-shaped flowers are white with a hint of pink. Clusters of beautiful apple-green fruits mature to bronzy-red, decorate the branch tips. Plant this striking evergreen in full sun or very light shade, where it can grow 10 ft. tall or more and will be very drought tolerant once established. An important early nectar source for hummingbirds and bumble bees.
Arctostaphylos montana ssp. montana  Mount Tamalpais manzanita
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Arctostaphylos montana ssp. montana

(Mount Tamalpais manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos montana ssp. ravenii  Presidio manzanita
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Arctostaphylos montana ssp. ravenii

(Presidio manzanita)

This diminutive, groundcover manzanita once grew on windswept, serpentine outcrops in San Francisco where the Presidio currently exists. Due to rapid development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, only one clone of this manzanita currently exists in the wild, making it one of the rarest species around. The small, thick, gray-green leaves line creeping stems reaching 6 - 12 inches in height. Forms a large mat over time, crawling around rocks and other obstacles. In late winter/early spring, clusters of little, white, urn-shaped flowers appear at the ends of the stems. Needs full sun to light shade and decent drainage. Drought tolerant once established but will enjoy an occasional deep watering, especially in warmer areas. You don’t have to be a collector to enjoy this appealing little manzanita.
Arctostaphylos montereyensis  Monterey manzanita
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Arctostaphylos montereyensis

(Monterey manzanita)

Beautiful pink flowers in winter and bright green leaves make this very rare manzanita from the Monterey Bay a must-have for the discerning collector. Slowly mounds to 5 or 6 ft. tall and round with a classic reddish trunk. Provide full sun to very light shade and occasional to no irrigation once established. So far we have found it to be surprisingly adaptable, tolerating some irrigation as it ages. Decent drainage will probably be needed. 
Arctostaphylos nummularia  glossy leaved manzanita
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Arctostaphylos nummularia

(glossy leaved manzanita)

Description coming soon!
Arctostaphylos nummularia 'Bear Belly' glossy-leaf manzanita
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Arctostaphylos nummularia 'Bear Belly'

(glossy-leaf manzanita)

A remarkably compact selection of this shiny-leaved manzanita discovered by Ken Taylor at Haven’s Neck on the southern Mendocino coast. Little bell-like flowers of pink-tinged white emerge in late winter set against small, round leaves growing regularly along the stems. The slightly shaggy bark is a reddish-brown color and contrasts nicely with the dark green foliage. Over a few years,this plant reaches a height of about 1 foot and a width of about 3 feet. Unlike most manzanitas, this species needs moderate water and protection from the hot afternoon sun in inland locales. Makes a great container plant.
Arctostaphylos osoensis  Oso manzanita
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Arctostaphylos osoensis

(Oso manzanita)

A beautiful and extremely rare manzanita from a small area above Morro Bay. The bright green leaves are auriculate, meaning “ear-shaped”, and have a distinctive matte finish, with new growth emerging in a reddish bronze color. Small clusters of dainty, pinkish-white flowers emerge in late winter/early spring and are adored by hummingbirds. The contorted branches are smooth and colored reddish-brown, aging to gray. Oso manzanita is attractively rounded and dense when young, only reaching to about 5 ft. or so in height with a slightly larger width. With age, it will begin to open, revealing its striking, sculptural trunks. Needs full sun and enjoys occasional irrigation, though it is quite drought tolerant once established.
Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Paradise' Pajaro manzanita
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Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Paradise'

(Pajaro manzanita)

This rare species offers striking foliage and flowers. Large flower clusters of a lovely shade of pink and are followed by prominent rusty-red berries, enjoyed by birds. Beautiful bronze new growth ages to an appealing blue-green which contrasts nicely with the shaggy cinnamon-colored bark. Approximately 6 ft. or more tall and 8 - 10 ft. across in 10 years. Full sun to light shade, excellent drainage with little to no water once established. Flowers are an excellent early source of nectar for hummingbirds and bumble bees.
Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Warren Roberts' Pajaro manzanita
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Arctostaphylos pajaroensis 'Warren Roberts'

(Pajaro manzanita)

This stunning manzanita displays coral-pink flowers in early winter set against chalky blue-green leaves. In the spring the burnished red new growth emerges creating a striking contrast with the older leaves. The widely curving branches covered with shaggy cinnamon colored bark create a wonderfully sculpted look. If left unpruned, this selection will form a broad drift, about 6ft. high and up to 8ft. wide. 'Warren Roberts' is denser and has more intense blue-green leaves than its sister, 'Paradise'. Provide full sun to very light shade and occasional to no irrigation once established. Needs decent drainage. Discovered by Roger Raiche.

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Arctostaphylos pumila 'Wavelength'

(sandmat manzanita)

A rare species endemic to areas on and around the Monterey Peninsula. ‘Wavelength’, a Dave Fross selection, is a dense, mounding, low shrub reaching 2 – 3 ft. tall and +10 ft. across. Soft, gray-green foliage and bronzy new growth accentuate its undulating form. White, lantern-shaped flowers appear in spring, enjoyed by hummingbirds. Great for sloped, drainy sites where it can take up a lot of real estate. Can take full sun to light shade. Low irrigation once established.
Arctostaphylos sensitiva  glossyleaf manzanita
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Arctostaphylos sensitiva

(glossyleaf manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos silvicola  ghostly manzanita
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Arctostaphylos silvicola

(ghostly manzanita)

Plant description coming soon.
Arctostaphylos silvicola 'Ghostly' Bonny Doon manzanita
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Arctostaphylos silvicola 'Ghostly'

(Bonny Doon manzanita)

Description coming soon!

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Arctostaphylos stanfordiana

(Stanford manzanita)

One of the most beautiful of manzanitas with handsome dark mahogany bark, dense shiny green leaves and flowers ranging in color from intense pink to white. Its upright form ranges in height from 4 to 8 ft with a somewhat narrower width. Native to warmer areas of northern California's Coast Range, this species requires excellent drainage, full sun and NO water once established.
Arctostaphylos stanfordiana 'Sonoma' Stanford manzanita
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Arctostaphylos stanfordiana 'Sonoma'

(Stanford manzanita)

Masses of deep pink flowers and glossy, deep green leaves are an enticing feature of this uncommon selection.  But what really distinguishes this cultivar from other Stanford manzanitas is the fact that it actually survives in the garden! Most other selections of this species are notoriously challenging to keep alive in cultivation. While fairly slow growing, the dense foliage mounds up over time to reach a height and width of about 5 ft. The striking burgundy-red trunks contrast nicely with the green leaves. Needs full sun and excellent drainage. No summer water once established.

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