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Scutellaria californica  California skullcap
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Scutellaria californica

(California skullcap)

A charming perennial native to gravelly soils of low and mid elevation mountains of Northern California where it grows on the edge of woodlands and chaparral communities. Leaves are arranged oppositely on erect stems less than one foot tall. The very sweet, small, creamy-white snapdragon-like flowers occur in pairs at the leaf axils. Spreads by underground rootstocks to form colonies. In our nutritious water retentive soils has spread quite vigorously, in dryer leaner soils less so. Plant in full sun to light shade. Drought tolerant but would appreciate a little summer water.
Scutellaria suffrutescens  pink Texas skullcap
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Scutellaria suffrutescens

(pink Texas skullcap)

Sturdy, compact, long blooming perennial growing less than 6 inches tall by 15 inches wide. Deep green foliage and dense growth habit make a tidy foil for the profusion of small rosy- pink snapdragon-like flowers over a long period spring-summer. Highly attractive to pollinators and hummingbirds. Plant in full sun to light shade with occasional water.  Drought and heat tolerant. Deer tolerant too.
Sedum  'Gold Thread' sedum
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Sedum 'Gold Thread'

(sedum)

What a gem! Found at a Cactus and Succulent Show and Sale at the Huntington Botanic Garden last year, this bright golden sedum is tiny and charming. So far the plants have remained compact, very slowly spreading, and able to tolerate a wide range of conditions. Has stayed under 2 inches tall and 8 inches wide. Seems to tolerate moisture, and drought tolerant as well. Golden in bright shade, burns in too much sun. Evergreen in winter, hardy so far. Best in well drained soil. A treasure for rock gardens, succulent bowls, in between pavers, en masse on an edge.
Sedum  'Lime Twister' stonecrop
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Sedum 'Lime Twister'

(stonecrop)

From the Sunsparkler Sedum hybrid program, this Sedum offers variegated cream and green foliage, growing 4 – 6 inches tall and 12 – 18 inches wide. The compact mounds spread slowly and are topped with bright pink flowers in late summer. Useful small scale groundcover for the front of the border, rock gardens, or containers. Good drainage and a little shade is best with moderate watering. Bees and butterflies are attracted to its flowers.
Sedum divergens  Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum divergens

(Pacific stonecrop)

This is a little beauty. Mat-forming and evergreen, this succulent is native to California north to Alaska. Tolerant of wet winters, the shiny round bead-like leaves turn a dark red in full sun. Stays compact and slowly spreads, 2 - 4 inches tall, reaching about 18 inches in diameter. Blooms starry yellow flowers in summer. Great in rock gardens, planters, useful as an edge plant. Adapts to many soil types. Fully hardy and drought tolerant once established. We have this planted in our trough in front of the greenhouse.
Sedum hispanicum  blue carpet, Spanish stonecrop
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Sedum hispanicum

(blue carpet, Spanish stonecrop)

A little cutie of a plant! Forming a cushion/mound of blue to blue-gray, tight, tiny, needle-like leaves, this stonecrop is gorgeous in a rock garden, between stepping stones, or in a succulent planter. It spreads very slowly, staying just 2 inches tall and getting about 8 inches wide. Looking the same through the winter (hardy and evergreen), the cold seems to bring out the deeper purple colors. Have not seen it bloom yet - supposedly pinkish white flowers in summer. Needs well-drained soil and sun to part shade to look its best. Let dry between waterings. A fantastic form! Planted in our trough in front of the greenhouse.
Sedum makinoi 'Ogon' Japanese stonecrop
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Sedum makinoi 'Ogon'

(Japanese stonecrop)

This beautiful succulent will brighten up a rock garden, wall, container or any place a small scale, shallow rooted groundcover is needed. The low mat has bright golden yellow flowers in the spring. Needs good drainage, sun to light shade (all but the hottest sun) and moderate water.
Sedum spathulifolium  Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum spathulifolium

(Pacific stonecrop)

A mat forming native succulent often seen on rocky cliffs and shady banks in California’s Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada north to British Columbia. Small, spoon-shaped leaves form flat rosettes where bright yellow star-like flowers appear in late spring and early summer. A natural for the rock garden or container plantings where they are best with part shade. Very drought tolerant.

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Sedum spathulifolium 'Campbell Lake'

(Pacific stonecrop)

Jenny Flemming’s selection from the Salmon Mountains in northwestern California. As chalky white as the Oregon native Sedum ‘Cape Blanco’. Good drainage and some shade inland. Excellent between rocks in unmortared rock retainer walls. Drought tolerant.

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Sedum spathulifolium 'Cape Blanco'

(common stonecrop)

A mat forming, western native succulent, often seen on rocky cliffs and shady banks in California’s Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada north to British Columbia. Small, spoon-shaped leaves form flat rosettes where bright yellow star-like flowers appear in late spring and early summer. The cultivar 'Cape Blanco' was selected along the Oregon coast, for its chalky-white foliage. A natural for the rock garden or container plantings where they are best with part shade. Very drought tolerant.  
Sedum  spathulifolium 'Elephant Rock' Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum spathulifolium 'Elephant Rock'

(Pacific stonecrop)

This distinctive form of our native stonecrop was discovered on Elephant Rock near Dylan Beach and introduced by Mostly Natives Nursery.Especially large grey-green spoon shaped leaves form luscious mats of flat rosettes.Jewel-like yellow flowers arise in the spring on stalks reaching about 6 inches tall.Excellent small scale ground cover for the well-drained garden in partial shade.Water occasionally once established.Good container subject too.  
Sedum spathulifolium 'Purpureum' Pacific stonecrop
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Sedum spathulifolium 'Purpureum'

(Pacific stonecrop)

This distinctive form of the Pacific stonecrop features purple leaves which turn particularly dark in the winter. Bright yellow flowers are produced in late spring and early summer on short stems up to 4 inches high. This mat forming succulent grows in rocky crevices and shady banks in California’s Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada north to British Columbia. The small, spoon-shaped leaves form flat rosettes. Needs excellent drainage and some shade, especially in the afternoon. A natural for the rock garden or container plantings where its diminutive nature can be appreciated. Very drought tolerant.
Sedum spurium 'John Creech' stonecrop
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Sedum spurium 'John Creech'

(stonecrop)

A durable semi-evergreen, hardy groundcover, suitable for pathways, rock gardens, and as a bank cover. ‘John Creech’ is a particulary low and tight form of S. spurium that grows 2 inches tall and spreads to a foot wide, then slowly creeps in a noninvasive manner. Its dense habit tends to keep weeds from poking through. Topped by purplish-pink flowers in summer that attract butterflies. Plant in well drained soil. Looks best with occasional summer water. Somewhat drought tolerant. Named for Dr. John Creech, of the U.S. National Arboretum, who discovered the plant in Siberia. Supposedly deer resistant.
Sedum telephium 'Autumn Joy' sedum
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Sedum telephium 'Autumn Joy'

(sedum)

Introduced to the U.S. in 1955, this dependable, late flowering, easy to grow perennial will except a wide range of conditions.  Fleshy blue-green leaves with large dusty rose-pink flower heads in summer turn a wonderful rust color with age. Sun, light shade, moderate to little water. About 2 - 2 1/2 ft tall. A bee and butterfly favorite.
Sempervivum  cultivars hen and chicks, houseleeks
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Sempervivum cultivars

(hen and chicks, houseleeks)

Native to the mountains of Europe and very hardy, semps are slowly clumping evergreen succulents for sunny areas with good drainage. Each spring babies (chicks) appear, radiating out from Mamma hen like the spokes of a wheel, that then root and start their own "family". In some cultivars, in mid to late summer, Mamma blooms with star-shaped (usually pink or reddish) flowers then dies, leaving her chicks to carry on. Easy to grow and fairly drought tolerant, they seem to be able to take a considerable amount of moisture. Great in containers. Used in ancient Europe on house roofs to insulate and "protect from lightening". Leaf colors vary according to the seasons, strong light results in more intense colorations. Easy to spread around the yard by breaking off a chick and transplanting to other areas. Long-lived. NOT deer resistant.
Sequoia sempervirens  coast redwood
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Sequoia sempervirens

(coast redwood)

A beautiful and fast growing conifer, famous, as it is the world’s tallest tree. Provides a symmetrical pyramid of soft fragrant foliage 70 to 100 ft. or more tall. Outside its native range it will be shorter, topping out at around 50 ft. The columnar trunks are covered with thick fibrous red-brown bark. Small one inch cones form in clusters at the branch tips. Grows easily in areas with coastal influence and fog but will grow in drier interior sites with regular summer water. Performs well in the regular watering regimes of many urban gardens and lawns. Can be planted as a specimen, in groves, or even pruned as a hedge. As long as its watering requirements are met it has very few pest or disease problems.
Sequoia  sempervirens 'Kelly's Prostrate' Kelly's prostrate coast redwood
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Sequoia sempervirens 'Kelly's Prostrate'

(Kelly's prostrate coast redwood)

A low growing form of the coast redwood with a flat, spreading habit.  Exceptionally low growing, we have never seen any upright growth in this form.  The flat sprays of foliage are deep green with light green new growth and spreading to five foot wide or more.  Best in moist, well drained soils with light shade. Use where the unique form can be shown off.  Makes an excellent container subject.
Sequoia sempervirens 'Nana Pendula' prostrate coast redwood
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Sequoia sempervirens 'Nana Pendula'

(prostrate coast redwood)

An intriguing prostrate form of the coast redwood. Bluish-green leaves on pendulous branches spread out in a circular form usually under 1 ft. tall. May mound up taller over time, trim out any tall leaders that may occur. An interesting specimen or container subject for lightly shaded areas with regular water. Grows much slower than the upright tree form of coast redwood, with the branches achieving a spread of around 6 to 12 ft. in ten years.
Sequoiadendron giganteum  giant Sequoia, Sierra redwood
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Sequoiadendron giganteum

(giant Sequoia, Sierra redwood)

This iconic Californian giant hales from the west side of the Sierra Nevada where it forms dramatic cathedrals with its massive, cinnamon-colored trunks. The leaves are gray-green and scale-like, hugging the billowing stems. In nature, this close relative of the coast redwood can be over 3,000 years old and reach over 300 ft. tall with trunks bulging to 56 ft. in diameter. In a garden setting you can expect a more reasonable height of 60 – 90 ft. with a canopy spread of around 40 ft. A stunning specimen tree for a large garden. Needs decent drainage and occasional irrigation when young, though it will become quite drought tolerant once established. Full sun to light shade. More cold hardy and drought tolerant than the coast redwood. Reported to be deer resistant.
Sesleria  'Campo Azul'  moor grass
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Sesleria 'Campo Azul'

( moor grass)

A distinctive cultivar introduced by Native Sons Nursery, selected from a seed flat of S. autumnalis. Thought to be of hybrid parentage, 'Campo Azul' is tolerant of a wide range of conditions. This handsome evergreen forms neat clumps of blue-gray blades, one foot or so tall and spreading to 2 ft. wide. The flowers are slender spikes of silvery-white and rise above the stiff blades to around 18 inches tall, summer through fall. Plant in full sun to light shade with moderate summer water. Afternoon shade is best in hot inland sites. This grass looks good year round and requires little maintenance. It does not respond to cutting back hard as some grasses do, but will tolerate a light trimming in late fall to freshen it's appearance. Useful deer resistant ground cover or meadow plant.
Sidalcea calycosa ssp. rhizomata  Point Reyes checkerbloom
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Sidalcea calycosa ssp. rhizomata

(Point Reyes checkerbloom)

Plant description coming soon.

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Sidalcea hendersonii

(Henderson's checkermallow)

A striking, rare checkerbloom from western Oregon northwards, featuring stalks up to 3 ft high densely clothed in substantial, rich pink flowers. The rounded, scalloped leaves create low mounds on the ground. Will slowly spread to from small drifts, blending beautifully with other showy perennials in the moist garden bed. Enjoys full sun to light shade. If the spent blooms are removed, it can bloom from spring through to autumn! Attractive to bees and butterflies. Works well in a container.
Sidalcea malviflora  checkerbloom
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Sidalcea malviflora

(checkerbloom)

Beautiful spring blooming native perennial found in moist meadows along the coast and inland from Southern Oregon to the Mexican border. Reliable and easy to grow, and an excellent addition to a grasslands or meadow planting. Grow in full sun to partial shade where it thrives with moisture and tolerates moderate to little water once established. With drought will go summer dormant. Light to dark pink, small to large flowered; they are all beautiful. A nectar and larval food source for the West Coast Lady, Painted Lady, Common Checkered Skipper, and the Gray Hairstreak butterflies.
Sidalcea malviflora 'Palustre' checkerbloom
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Sidalcea malviflora 'Palustre'

(checkerbloom)

This selection of our native checkerbloom has particularly large, saturated pink flowers held on stems which spread across the ground. Leathery, dark-green, scalloped leaves form a carpet on this small-scale groundcover. Plant in full sun to light shade and provide moderate irrigation. Butterflies nectar on the flowers and also use checkerbloom as a larval host plant. West Coast lady, painted lady, checkered skipper and gray hairstreak butterflies all depend on this species to support their caterpillars.
Sidalcea malviflora ssp. patula  Siskiyou checkerbloom
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Sidalcea malviflora ssp. patula

(Siskiyou checkerbloom)

Bright, rose-pink flowers line foot long stems on this rare checkermallow from northwest California. Spreading mats of fuzzy, round leaves only a couple of inches tall provide an appealing backdrop for the colorful flowers. Enjoys full sun to part shade. Protect from the hot afternoon sun in inland climates. Provide moderate to occasional irrigation. An excellent plant for bees and butterflies. 

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