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Staphylea bolanderi  bladdernut
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Staphylea bolanderi

(bladdernut)

Description coming soon.
Stipa (Nassella) cernua  nodding needlegrass
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Stipa (Nassella) cernua

(nodding needlegrass)

A beautiful native grass said to be a more impressive horticultural subject than the tough and useful Stipa pulchra. Forms a tufted bunch of foliage with elegant flower stems to about 2 ft. tall. The panicles of thin, fine, nodding awns have a silky aspect and are purplish at first drying silver. They glimmer when backlit. Prefers full sun (but will tolerate light shade) and well drained soils, but has proven adaptable. Drought tolerant. Often self sows. Deer resistant.

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Stipa (Nassella) lepida

(foothill needlegrass)

The native foothill needlegrass is a fine-bladed, medium-sized, perennial bunchgrass perfectly adapted to our Mediterranean climate. Growing vegetatively during the cool season and flowering in mid to late spring, going dormant with the dry of summer. Tufts of fine-textured blades 8 - 12 inches tall, give rise to slender, graceful flowering stems, 2 ft or more tall with panicles of silky awns which shimmer when back lit. Well suited for the dry garden, open woods, meadows and rocky slopes. Easy to grow, disease and pest resistant, tolerating more shade than other Stipa species. A strong re-seeder and deer resistant. Host plant for a number of butterflies. Deer resistant.
Stipa (Nassella) pulchra  purple needlegrass
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Stipa (Nassella) pulchra

(purple needlegrass)

Purple needlegrass is a major species in California grasslands. An excellent choice for naturalistic settings, native plantings, meadows or dry slopes in full sun. Handsome in mass where its purple awns shimmer. The entire plant turns golden come summer then goes dormant, reviving with the rainy season. Can reseed vigorously. Deer resistant.
Styrax redivivus  snowdrop bush
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Styrax redivivus

(snowdrop bush)

A beautiful but little known California native. Slow to mature but worth the wait. Develops into a graceful multistemed deciduous shrub. Dark green rounded leaves clothe the smooth gray branches. Late spring brings dangling clusters of pure white, waxy, bell-shaped blossoms. Grows 6 to 10 ft. tall for sun to light shade. Drought tolerant. We have observed hummingbirds and pipevine swallowtail butterflies nectaring on styrax blossoms.
Succulent Plants
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Succulent Plants

There are many good sources of information on the web for succulents. Some of our favorite urls are listed here: http://crassulaceae.net/ http://www.sedumphotos.net/main.php http://ucanr.edu/sites/scmg/Top_Plants_Category_Parent/Succulents/ http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/996/ http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1441/ http://sempervivoscope.voila.net/ http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.semperhor... http://www.xericworld.com/forums/home.php http://www.agavaceae.com/agavaceae/agavhome_en.asp http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/199/ http://www.sfsucculent.org/
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus  snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus

(snowberry)

Snowberry is a deciduous, native shrub for dry or moist shade. Reaches about 4 ft. tall and spreading. Clusters of tiny, pinkish, urn-shaped flowers are followed by showy white berries on arching branches. Responds well to shearing. A good choice for under native oaks. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Bartlett Springs' snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Bartlett Springs'

(snowberry)

Snowberry is a deciduous, native shrub for dry or moist shade. Reaches about 4 ft. tall and spreading. Our own selection from Lake County, has particularly large oval leaves on graceful arching branches with exceptionally big fruits. Clusters of tiny, pinkish, urn-shaped flowers are followed by showy white berries on the branch tips. Responds well to shearing. A good choice for under native oaks. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds and bees like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'San Bruno Mountain' snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'San Bruno Mountain'

(snowberry)

This attractive low-growing form of our native snowberry is a Cal Flora Nursery selection from San Bruno Mountain. Its dimensions are about 8 inches tall and spreading. Indeed the spreading nature of this plant is robust & it should be included in areas where that is an asset rather than a liability. The wiry arching branches hold light green rounded leaves & the effect of the new growth is delicate and appealing. Tiny pink urn-shaped flowers decorate the branch tips, followed by small white fruits. Perfect for a lightly shaded bank or the light shade of a tree where it will be very drought tolerant. With total drought it may go summer deciduous but occasional summer water will keep it looking fresh. The flowers attract bees and hummingbirds.              
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Tilden Park' snowberry
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Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Tilden Park'

(snowberry)

Here is a particularly fine selection of the native snowberry, notable for its dependable crop of showy white berries on arching branches. A deciduous shrub, snowberry grows to about 4 ft. tall and spreads to form drifts. A good choice for a shady bank, woodland edge, or under oaks. Appreciates and responds to moisture, but once established will tolerate dry conditions. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.

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Symphoricarpos mollis

(creeping snowberry)

Low growing, spreading groundcover, usually staying around a foot tall by 3-4 foot wide. Rounded blue-green leaves on arching stems makes an excellent low growing thicket which competes well with tree roots. An amenable plant, able to grow in full sun in coastal areas and different depths of shade elsewhere, even fairly deep shade. The tiny, pink, bell shaped flowers are attractive to bees and hummingbirds and the white fruits that follow are eaten by birds. Good for erosion control and does well under oaks. Offers excellent habitat value with its flowers and fruits and provides cover for ground nesting birds. Drought tolerant once established. Deer often leave it alone.    
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus  coralberry
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Symphoricarpos orbiculatus

(coralberry)

Coralberry is a dense bushy deciduous shrub native to the eastern U.S. Soft downy foliage makes an attractive leaf pattern growing 3 to 4 ft. tall and spreading. Tiny urn-shaped flowers are followed by unusual eye catching purplish-pink berries. Thrives with part shade and moisture, but NOT deep shade.

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