Our Plants

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z

Pages

Trichostema lanatum  woolly blue curls
More information »

Trichostema lanatum

(woolly blue curls)

Woolly blue curls is a much sought after evergreen shrub with pungent, dark green, narrow leaves and spectacular flower spikes. Grows 3-4 foot tall and wide and blooms over a long period.  Blue-purple to pink flowers, covered in purple hairs with protruding, long, curving stamens are a sight to behold. Native to coastal scrub and chaparral communities from Monterey county to northern Baja. Requires full sun, good drainage and is drought tolerant once established. Avoid regular irrigation, fertilizer and organic mulches. Pollinated by hummingbirds and visited by bumblebees and butterflies. Deer resistant.
Trientalis latifolia  star flower
More information »

Trientalis latifolia

(star flower)

Shade loving native perennial, inhabiting open woods from San Luis Obispo County to British Columbia. Forming small colonies from underground tuberous rootstock. Slender stems rise 6 inches tall with a whorl of neat leaves at the top of the erect stems. Dainty pink star-shaped flowers are suspended above the leaves on thread-like pedicels. Flourishes in loose, woodsy, acidic soils in lightly shaded areas. Thrives with the spring rains, then goes dormant in the summer dry period. A charming addition to the shade garden.
Trillium  chloropetalum  giant Trillium
More information »

Trillium chloropetalum

(giant Trillium)

The beautiful and distinctive giant Trillium is an elegant addition to the woodland garden.Native to coastal and interior open forests and woodlands of the San Francisco Bay Area and North Coast Ranges.Emerges in February with three broad leaves surrounding a leafless stem 10-18 inches tall. A single large flower arises directly from the whorl of leaves and can vary from white, pink, to maroon red. The leaves often have green or maroon mottling. After flowering it dies back to the ground. Prefers the dappled light of a woodland setting with humusy well drained soil and some summer moisture.
Triteleia hyacinthina  white brodiaea
More information »

Triteleia hyacinthina

(white brodiaea)

One of the easier to grow native bulbs that adapts well to garden conditions. Native to vernally moist areas that become summer dry in the Coast Ranges, Central Valley and Sierra Nevada into southwestern Oregon. Slender flowering stems rise one to two feet above the narrow leaves, with umbels of white, star-shaped flowers with green centers. If happy, the corms will multiply, forming drifts among grasses and shrubs and in open woodland settings. Easy to grow in containers, where they can be stashed in the shade once they go dormant. Bee and butterfly favorite.
Triteleia laxa 'Corrina' Ithuriel's spear
More information »

Triteleia laxa 'Corrina'

(Ithuriel's spear)

A beautifully dark flowered form of our Ithuriel’s spear, with flowers a darker blue-purple than the more common ‘Queen Fabiola’. The trumpet-shaped flowers form circular clusters at the top of slender stalks 12 to 18 inches high. This easy to grow bulb sends up slender, grass-like leaves in late winter followed by the striking flowers in late spring. Multiplies readily forming colorful drifts which mix well with grasses and smaller perennials. Tolerant of pretty much all soil types and can be allowed to dry out completely in summer when it goes dormant. Unlike most grassland bulbs, this species will also tolerate moderate irrigation. Plant in full sun to light shade. Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.
Triteleia laxa 'Queen Fabiola' Ithuriel's spear
More information »

Triteleia laxa 'Queen Fabiola'

(Ithuriel's spear)

Trumpets of bluish-purple blossoms make a dazzling display at the height of spring on this easily grown lily relative. The showy flowers rise up to 18 inches tall in dense whorls on slender stalks above grasslike leaves. The small bulbs increase rapidly to form small, colorful drifts. Give full sun to light shade. Tolerant of dry conditions but accepts occasional irrigation. Will go dormant by mid-summer but reemerges in early winter. Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Plant in openings between low, evergreen plants or in meadows with yarrow, California fuchsia and grasses. 
Triteleia laxa 'Rudy' Ithuriel's spear
More information »

Triteleia laxa 'Rudy'

(Ithuriel's spear)

Description coming soon!

More information »

Triteleia laxa 'White Cloud'

(Ithuriel's spear)

A white form of Ithuriel’s spear?! We kid you not. You may be familiar with this species and its traditionally blue-purple, trumpet-shaped flowers perched in whorls atop stalks up to a foot tall. We now have a selection featuring soft white flowers. This native bulb sends up grass-like foliage in the winter followed by the charming flowers in spring and early summer. The bulbs multiply readily, forming small colonies over time. While it tolerates dry conditions in summer, it will also accept occasional irrigation, making it very useful in the garden. Enjoys full sun to light shade and will tolerate clay soil. 

Pages

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z