Our Plants

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z

Pages

Sphenosciadium capitellatum  ranger's buttons
More information »

Sphenosciadium capitellatum

(ranger's buttons)

We are excited to offer this denizen of mountain meadows and forests known for its clusters of white flowers or “buttons” on tall stalks reaching up to 5 feet in height.  Lance-shaped leaves of bright green form upright mounds at the base of the stalks.  Ranger buttons are easily identified by the hairy stems within the inflorescences.  Provide regular water and dappled shade.  This unusual member of the carrot family combines beautifully with ferns, lilies and other forest dwellers.
Spiraea densiflora  'Trinity Rose' mountain spiraea
More information »

Spiraea densiflora 'Trinity Rose'

(mountain spiraea)

This cultivar hails from the Trinity Alps in northwestern California.  A neat looking deciduous shrub growing 2-3 foot tall and wide with a compact habit and pretty bluish-green leaves.  Early summer brings flat topped clusters of rosy-pink flowers on the branch tips. Foliage often takes on nice yellow tones in the autumn before losing its leaves. Plant in sun to light shade with regular water. Flowers attract butterflies.
Spiraea douglasii  western spirea, rose spirea
More information »

Spiraea douglasii

(western spirea, rose spirea)

In summer, wands of violet-pink flower clusters decorate the branch tips of this deciduous shrub. Forms broad thickets 3 - 6 ft. tall with bluish-green leaves. Enjoys regular moisture and full sun to light shade. Great for a naturalistic planting in a woodland garden or along streams. Attracts bees and butterflies and is a larval host for various butterflies and moths in its native range. Native to the coast and into the mountains from northern California to Alaska.
Sporobolus airoides  dropseed sacaton
More information »

Sporobolus airoides

(dropseed sacaton)

A robust, warm season bunchgrass, which was common in California’s Central Valley prior to agricultural conversion. This western native is found in the Sierra foothills, South Coast Ranges as well as deserts from eastern Washington to Mexico. Forms a dense bunch of fine textured, grey-green blades, 1 to 3 foot tall and wide. Graceful flowering stems carry airy, pinkish flower heads that produce a pink-hued haze, which age to tan. The abundant seeds are relished by birds, but do not tend to reseed in gardens. Tolerant of many soil types and water regimes. Best with full sun to light shade. This grass will be drought tolerant, but does best with some summer water in dryer inland sites. Leaves turn butter-yellow in autumn prior to winter dormancy. Deer resistant.
Stachys albens  hedgenettle
More information »

Stachys albens

(hedgenettle)

Plant description coming soon.

More information »

Stachys bullata

(California hedgenettle)

A native perennial from the mint family, found primarily near the coast from San Francisco southward, where it inhabits oak, pine and fir woodlands. Medium-green leaves are softly fuzzy with scalloped edges, growing around 2 ft. tall and spreading by underground rhizomes to form a colony. Blooming spring through summer, with lavender-pink tubular flowers in whorls, which attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Tends to grow in somewhat drier areas, but responds well to moisture and also tolerates inundation. A natural with rushes, ferns and snowberries. Useful for partly shaded bioswales and oak/mixed conifer woodlands. The underground rhizomes make it a good choice for erosion control. Deer resistant.
Staphylea bolanderi  bladdernut
More information »

Staphylea bolanderi

(bladdernut)

Description coming soon.
Stipa (Nassella) cernua  nodding needlegrass
More information »

Stipa (Nassella) cernua

(nodding needlegrass)

A beautiful native grass said to be a more impressive horticultural subject than the tough and useful Stipa pulchra. Forms a tufted bunch of foliage with elegant flower stems to about 2 ft. tall. The panicles of thin, fine, nodding awns have a silky aspect and are purplish at first drying silver. They glimmer when backlit. Prefers full sun (but will tolerate light shade) and well drained soils, but has proven adaptable. Drought tolerant. Often self sows. Deer resistant.

More information »

Stipa (Nassella) lepida

(foothill needlegrass)

The native foothill needlegrass is a fine-bladed, medium-sized, perennial bunchgrass perfectly adapted to our Mediterranean climate. Growing vegetatively during the cool season and flowering in mid to late spring, going dormant with the dry of summer. Tufts of fine-textured blades 8 - 12 inches tall, give rise to slender, graceful flowering stems, 2 ft or more tall with panicles of silky awns which shimmer when back lit. Well suited for the dry garden, open woods, meadows and rocky slopes. Easy to grow, disease and pest resistant, tolerating more shade than other Stipa species. A strong re-seeder and deer resistant. Host plant for a number of butterflies. Deer resistant.
Stipa (Nassella) pulchra  purple needlegrass
More information »

Stipa (Nassella) pulchra

(purple needlegrass)

Purple needlegrass is a major species in California grasslands. An excellent choice for naturalistic settings, native plantings, meadows or dry slopes in full sun. Handsome in mass where its purple awns shimmer. The entire plant turns golden come summer then goes dormant, reviving with the rainy season. Can reseed vigorously. Deer resistant.
Styrax redivivus  snowdrop bush
More information »

Styrax redivivus

(snowdrop bush)

A beautiful but little known California native. Slow to mature but worth the wait. Develops into a graceful multistemed deciduous shrub. Dark green rounded leaves clothe the smooth gray branches. Late spring brings dangling clusters of pure white, waxy, bell-shaped blossoms. Grows 6 to 10 ft. tall for sun to light shade. Drought tolerant. We have observed hummingbirds and pipevine swallowtail butterflies nectaring on styrax blossoms.
Succulent Plants
More information »

Succulent Plants

There are many good sources of information on the web for succulents. Some of our favorite urls are listed here: http://crassulaceae.net/ http://www.sedumphotos.net/main.php http://ucanr.edu/sites/scmg/Top_Plants_Category_Parent/Succulents/ http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/996/ http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1441/ http://sempervivoscope.voila.net/ http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.semperhor... http://www.xericworld.com/forums/home.php http://www.agavaceae.com/agavaceae/agavhome_en.asp http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/199/ http://www.sfsucculent.org/
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus  snowberry
More information »

Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus

(snowberry)

Snowberry is a deciduous, native shrub for dry or moist shade. Reaches about 4 ft. tall and spreading. Clusters of tiny, pinkish, urn-shaped flowers are followed by showy white berries on arching branches. Responds well to shearing. A good choice for under native oaks. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Bartlett Springs' snowberry
More information »

Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Bartlett Springs'

(snowberry)

Snowberry is a deciduous, native shrub for dry or moist shade. Reaches about 4 ft. tall and spreading. Our own selection from Lake County, has particularly large oval leaves on graceful arching branches with exceptionally big fruits. Clusters of tiny, pinkish, urn-shaped flowers are followed by showy white berries on the branch tips. Responds well to shearing. A good choice for under native oaks. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds and bees like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'San Bruno Mountain' snowberry
More information »

Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'San Bruno Mountain'

(snowberry)

This attractive low-growing form of our native snowberry is a Cal Flora Nursery selection from San Bruno Mountain. Its dimensions are about 8 inches tall and spreading. Indeed the spreading nature of this plant is robust & it should be included in areas where that is an asset rather than a liability. The wiry arching branches hold light green rounded leaves & the effect of the new growth is delicate and appealing. Tiny pink urn-shaped flowers decorate the branch tips, followed by small white fruits. Perfect for a lightly shaded bank or the light shade of a tree where it will be very drought tolerant. With total drought it may go summer deciduous but occasional summer water will keep it looking fresh. The flowers attract bees and hummingbirds.              
Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Tilden Park' snowberry
More information »

Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus 'Tilden Park'

(snowberry)

Here is a particularly fine selection of the native snowberry, notable for its dependable crop of showy white berries on arching branches. A deciduous shrub, snowberry grows to about 4 ft. tall and spreads to form drifts. A good choice for a shady bank, woodland edge, or under oaks. Appreciates and responds to moisture, but once established will tolerate dry conditions. Fruit may be toxic to humans. Hummingbirds like the flowers. Berries are palatable to hermit thrush, Swainson’s thrush, robins and other birds. Also creates good cover for birds.

More information »

Symphoricarpos mollis

(creeping snowberry)

Low growing, spreading groundcover, usually staying around a foot tall by 3-4 foot wide. Rounded blue-green leaves on arching stems makes an excellent low growing thicket which competes well with tree roots. An amenable plant, able to grow in full sun in coastal areas and different depths of shade elsewhere, even fairly deep shade. The tiny, pink, bell shaped flowers are attractive to bees and hummingbirds and the white fruits that follow are eaten by birds. Good for erosion control and does well under oaks. Offers excellent habitat value with its flowers and fruits and provides cover for ground nesting birds. Drought tolerant once established. Deer often leave it alone.    
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus  coralberry
More information »

Symphoricarpos orbiculatus

(coralberry)

Coralberry is a dense bushy deciduous shrub native to the eastern U.S. Soft downy foliage makes an attractive leaf pattern growing 3 to 4 ft. tall and spreading. Tiny urn-shaped flowers are followed by unusual eye catching purplish-pink berries. Thrives with part shade and moisture, but NOT deep shade.
Tanacetum bipinnatum (camphoratum)  dune tansy
More information »

Tanacetum bipinnatum (camphoratum)

(dune tansy)

Native to sand dunes from the Bay Area north, this shrubby evergreen groundcover spreads quickly to create drifts of soft fern-like foliage. Yellow, button-shaped flowers form small clusters atop stalks up to 2 ft. tall. Enjoys full sun to light shade. Tolerant of clay soils and excessive moisture but will thrive with only occasional water once established. Reducing irrigation can temper this tansy's somewhat aggressive nature.  Dune tansy has a strong scent of camphor and is valued for its medicinal uses. Beautiful when combined with ceanothus, Douglas iris and other plants from our coastal areas. Good for erosion control.
Tauschia kelloggii  umbrellawort
More information »

Tauschia kelloggii

(umbrellawort)

Plant description coming soon.
Taxus brevifolia  Pacific yew
More information »

Taxus brevifolia

(Pacific yew)

Plant description coming soon.
Tellima grandiflora  fringe cups
More information »

Tellima grandiflora

(fringe cups)

Fringe cups is a sweet native perennial for the shade garden. Many small, urn-shaped flowers with tiny fringed petals open green and age to pink, line the slender flower stalks. These rise above the soft mounds of foliage 18 inches to 2 ft. Seeds about in a nice way. Tolerates dry shade. Deer resistant.
Teucrium chamaedrys  germander
More information »

Teucrium chamaedrys

(germander)

Tough, neat looking evergreen shrublet-good for hot dry places. Excellent edging for herb gardens. Grows 1 ft. tall by 2 ft. wide. Dark green foliage topped with light magenta flowers in spikes. Shear after blooming. Deer seem to leave it alone. Bee favorite.
Teucrium cossonii (majoricum)  Majorcan teucrium
More information »

Teucrium cossonii (majoricum)

(Majorcan teucrium)

A beautiful little shrublet that hugs the ground to 2 ft. or more wide. Narrow gray-green foiage is topped with dense clusters of rosy-lavender flowers, nearly the entire growing season. Requires decent drainage with moderate to occasional summer water once established. Great rock garden plant. Pollinator friendly and deer resistant.  
Teucrium fruticans 'Azureum' bush germander
More information »

Teucrium fruticans 'Azureum'

(bush germander)

Upright silver foliaged evergreen shrub with wonderful azure blue flowers most of the summer.  Good for sunny dry areas where they combine nicely with other drought tolerant plants such as lavenders, rock roses, Phlomis, etc. Grows to about 3 - 4 ft. tall and wide. Teucriums are bee favorites. Deer resistant.

Pages

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Z