Our Plants

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    V    W    X    Z

Pages

Hoita macrostachya  leather root
More information »

Hoita macrostachya

(leather root)

Plant description coming soon.
Holodiscus discolor  cream bush, ocean spray
More information »

Holodiscus discolor

(cream bush, ocean spray)

An elegant, deciduous, native shrub growing 5 - 6 ft. tall or more, depending on the site, and at least as wide. Beautiful, cascading clusters of creamy white flowers hang from branch tips in early summer. The fragrant flowers attract pollinators and a number of butterflies use it as a host plant. Best with light shade. Drought tolerant, but will accept some moisture.
Holodiscus dumosus var. cedrorus  Cedars cream bush
More information »

Holodiscus dumosus var. cedrorus

( Cedars cream bush)

A recently described endemic shrub discovered by the extraordinary plantsmen Roger Raiche, growing on serpentine soils of the Cedars in northwestern Sonoma County. An open deciduous shrub, approximately 3 ft. x 3 ft. with wiry ruby-red stems and elegant small, shiny, dark green to bronze leaves. Early summer brings erect panicles of cream colored flowers that are suffused in light wine-red or pink coloration. Seems to tolerate a wide range of conditions from full sun to deep shade. Once established has proven durable and drought tolerant. This lovely small creambush is perfect for those who want something completely new and different. It does well in containers and should be interesting to experiment with in different applications and settings.    
Hordeum brachyantherum  meadow barley
More information »

Hordeum brachyantherum

(meadow barley)

Native to a wide range of vernally wet plant communities throughout California and beyond. Once abundant throughout the Santa Rosa Valley where it could be found in grasslands, seasonal flood plains, moist meadow and open riparian areas.  Forms perennial clumps with blades 6-10 inches tall, flower stalks to 30 inches are topped with narrow spikes of purple tinged upward facing bristles, looking like a small version of a classic cereal grain seedhead. Tolerant of heavy clay, alkaline or saline soils.  Doesn't make a big impact standing alone,  best used in mass or in a blend of other native meadow grasses where its slender flower heads make a pleasing effect.  Plant in full sun with vernally wet soils.  Deer resistant.
Iris chrysophylla  slender-tubed iris
More information »

Iris chrysophylla

(slender-tubed iris)

Native to far northern California and into western Oregon, this uncommon iris grows in fast draining soils in open forests and woodlands. A small scale iris, usually under 12 inches tall in bloom, spreads slowly from slender rhizomes. The delicate blossoms flower in the spring and can vary in color from white to cream to yellow, with a central yellow splash and prominent dark venation. Grow in sun to light shade with occasional to little watering. Visited by bees and hummingbirds. Deer resistant.
Iris douglasiana  Douglas iris
More information »

Iris douglasiana

(Douglas iris)

Native to the California coast from Santa Barbara to Oregon. Grows both on the edge of coastal forests and on bluffs and prairies along the ocean. Clumps of evergreen, sword-shaped leaves increase readily and are topped with violet-purple blossoms early to mid spring. Important nectar producer for native bees. An adaptable garden subject for cool full sun to light shade. Drought tolerant once established, but occasional summer water will help keep foliage fresher. Deer resistant.
Iris douglasiana 'Canyon Snow' white Douglas iris
More information »

Iris douglasiana 'Canyon Snow'

(white Douglas iris)

A dependable and floriferous selection of the native Douglas iris, with springtime flowers that are pure white with yellow markings on the falls. Broad shiny blades are mostly evergreen and grow a foot or more tall and form compact clumps. Plant in sun to part shade, particularly in hot inland areas, with moderate to little summer water. Prefers good drainage but will grow well on clay soils provided they are mounded up. Too much summer water on heavy soils will prove fatal. Deer resistant.
Iris douglasiana 'Marin Mauve' iris
More information »

Iris douglasiana 'Marin Mauve'

(iris)

Plant description coming soon.
Iris douglasiana 'Pt. Reyes' iris
More information »

Iris douglasiana 'Pt. Reyes'

(iris)

This is the classic iris seen along our coastline. A vigorous form with compact dark green leaves and a profusion of dark purple flowers, spreading to form large clumps. Beautiful when grown in a meadow of native grasses and coastal wildflowers. Prefers light shade in warmer areas and occasional water for it to look its best. Pruning the leaves down to the ground in the Fall can help the plant maintain a fresh appearance. Deer tolerant.  
Iris fernaldii  Fernald's iris
More information »

Iris fernaldii

(Fernald's iris)

Rarely offered in nurseries, the creamy-white to soft, buttery-yellow flowers of Iris fernaldii brighten up any dry shade to part-sun, inland garden in April. The flowers rise a foot above the evergreen, narrow, strap-like, deep-green foliage. This patch-forming Iris can be found in the more inland canyons of Northwestern California, from the Santa Cruz mountains, throughout inland Sonoma County, to Lake, Colusa, and Glenn counties. Fernald’s iris is well adapted to both extreme heat and cold, but can also perform well in full sun on the coast. Native bees and butterflies are attracted to the cheery flowers of this iris. This species prefers decent drainage and is drought tolerant and deer resistant once established.  
Iris innominata  Del Norte County iris
More information »

Iris innominata

(Del Norte County iris)

A choice iris with slender, glossy, dark-green leaves and dainty flowers in late spring. Flower color can be from brilliant yellows to shades of purple. Native to the Siskiyou Mountains in Del Norte County, California, into southern Oregon where it forms low, dense, evergreen clumps in openings of woodlands or coniferous forests. This species does better in hot, inland areas than the Douglas iris. Requires good drainage and some summer water. This Del Norte County iris has been used in hybridization programs to produce the popular Pacific Coast Hybrid Iris. Deer resistant.
Iris longipetala  iris
More information »

Iris longipetala

(iris)

Restricted to swales and moist areas in coastal grasslands from San Francisco to Monterey, this uncommon native is well worth growing. Bluish-green evergreen blades form erect clumps one foot to 20 inches tall. Early spring brings beautiful lavender-blue flowers with dark purple venation. Full sun in coastal areas, a little shade inland with regular water through the bloom period. Can go dryer once flowering is finished. Deer resistant.
Iris macrosiphon  long tube iris
More information »

Iris macrosiphon

(long tube iris)

A widespread and variable species growing throughout Northern California’s coast ranges and Sierra Nevada foothills. Our crop is grown from seed collected in western Sonoma County which has lovely lavender-blue blossoms April through May. Forms small clumps of narrow and slightly arching blades under 18 inches tall. Often found on wooded slopes, in openings or edges of forests where it will form small patches. Prefers good drainage, drought tolerant, or just a little summer moisture. Deer resistant.
Iris  macrosiphon 'Mount Madonna' long tube Iris
More information »

Iris macrosiphon 'Mount Madonna'

(long tube Iris)

A charming little Iris discovered by Wintergreen Nursery on Mt. Madonna on our central coast. In spring, lavender flowers with deep purple veination and a splash of yellow sit atop dense, fan-like clusters of narrow, blue-green leaves. Reaches a height of about 10 inches and spreads slowly to form little clumps. Provide bright, filtered shade and low to no water once established. Will tolerate full sun in cooler areas. An excellent Iris for a rock garden which attracts bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid  Pacific Coast hybrid iris
More information »

Iris Pacific Coast hybrid

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Canyon Sunshine' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
More information »

Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Canyon Sunshine'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Dark Delight' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
More information »

Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Dark Delight'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Madonna Three' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
More information »

Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Madonna Three'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Sebastopol' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
More information »

Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Sebastopol'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Violeta' Pacific Coast hybrid iris
More information »

Iris Pacific Coast hybrid 'Violeta'

(Pacific Coast hybrid iris)

A diverse group bred from the native irises with wonderful coloration, patterning, flower form variation....ranging from soft pastels to mahogany, maroon and midnight purple. Evergreen foliage, about 1 to 2 ft. high. Can eventually form sizable clumps. Full sun to light shade. Often do well as an understory for oaks that needs no summer water. Drought tolerant, moderate to little water when established. Deer don’t seem to eat flowers or foliage.
Isomeris (Cleomella) arborea  bladderpod
More information »

Isomeris (Cleomella) arborea

(bladderpod)

This distinctive small shrub from Southern California features clusters of golden-yellow flowers with long stamens, giving them a delicate, airy quality. The flowers are followed by papery, lantern-like seed pods which can become almost translucent with age. While this species blooms strongest in the spring, flowers can be seen year-round. Bladderpod has a loose, rounded habit, reaching 4 to 6 ft. tall and wide. If your plant becomes too lanky, simply cut it to the ground to rejuvenate it. Plant in full sun with good drainage and provide infrequent to zero irrigation once established. A great nectar source for hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Deer resistant.  Previously known as: Peritoma arborea
Juglans hindsii  California black walnut
More information »

Juglans hindsii

(California black walnut)

Beautiful, deciduous tree native to riparian areas in Northern California. Canopies of pinnately compound leaves form a round-topped tree 20 - 60 ft. tall. Flowers in early spring are dangling catkins, followed by round nuts in a fleshy husk. The delicious nuts are small and held in thick, hard to crack shells. An important food source for wildlife. Prefers deep soils and is drought tolerant once established. A natural for along the upper slopes of creeks and rivers.
Juncus effusus  soft rush
More information »

Juncus effusus

(soft rush)

Striking plant with bright green, erect, cylindrical blades that arch somewhat toward the tips. Creamy-gold, tassel-like flowers appear near the tips in spring and early summer. Grows 3 ft. or more tall and wide. Native to moist habitats in temperate regions of the world. Can grow in full sun to light shade with regular to moderate water. A natural for water features, making a great foliage accent for pools, ponds, or streamsides. Can grow in shallow water. Great in containers too. Deer resistant.
Juncus patens  California grey rush
More information »

Juncus patens

(California grey rush)

This handsome evergreen rush provides a striking vertical accent 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 ft. tall with grey-green to grey-blue foliage. Brownish-yellow, tassel-like flowers appear in the spring and early summer. Very adaptable, tolerating a wide range of conditions. Enjoys sun with moisture, but will tolerate dry conditions once established. Accepts moderate shade. Robust root systems are excellent for soil stabilization. Deer resistant.
Juncus patens 'Elk Blue' California grey rush
More information »

Juncus patens 'Elk Blue'

(California grey rush)

Introduced by San Marcos Growers, this form of Juncus patens was selected from the hills southeast of the town of Elk in Mendocino County. Features exceptionally blue foliage and and a vigorous spreading habit. This selection is shorter than the typical grey rush only reaching about 18 inches tall. An adaptable species, will thrive in moist soils, even shallow water but once established tolerates dry conditions too. Grows in sun to moderate shade. An excellent accent plant with its stiff, vertical foliage. Deer resistant.

Pages

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    V    W    X    Z